I may be slow … but I get there!

Red is a male African Leopard Tortoise, named by his rescuer because he had red paint all over his shell. Sometimes people do stupid things to defenseless creatures. Red likes to graze on the grass in his outdoor pen.

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There are dozens and dozens of turtle species in North America. ETR currently has several species native to the U.S., including mud turtles, musk turtles, spotted turtles, sliders and cooters, and box turtles. I’ve got a few pictures of my turtles.

Our lovely Indian Star Tortoises (Geochelone elegans) include one female and two males. Several years ago, the female was very sick and had a tube inserted into her stomach so I could administer antibiotics and liquids. I included a couple of pictures of her when she was sick.

Australia and New Guinea are home to short-neck turtles and snakeneck turtles. These are different from turtles we see in the U.S., which have neck that go in-and-out in a straight line fashion. When short necks and snakenecks pull their necks in, they fold them to the side. Here are a few of our Australian species.

ETR has two Leopard tortoises (Geochelone pardalis), which are native to Africa. One of our Leopards is an adult male, while the other is an unsexed juvenile.

Pyxis arachnoides arachnoides is one of several rare and endangered tortoise species in Madagascar. The ones at ETR are captive bred and about 4 years old. They’re small and grow slowly.

These are adult Cuora mouhotii, which are Asian turtles also know as the Keeled Box Turtle.

 

Kapidolo Farms

All Tortoise - All the Time

llywindatravels 2018

Independent Travelers take on the world

Reptile Names

Nomenclature, Taxonomy and Systematics of Reptiles

Enchanted Turtle Retreat

I may be slow ... but I get there!